A Time for Greatness?

Jan 10, 2014 by

 

More than in any of the past three or four years, I found myself reading articles and blog posts from journalists participating in the Baseball Hall of Fame voting.   Articles centered around whom they voted for and their justification, why the process is broken, along with a few pieces on the careers of Maddux and Glavine.  It just felt like there was more content than usual about the upcoming vote for the Hall. 

I feel the reasons for uptick in Hall of Fame articles this year boiled down to three points.  1.)  A player, unlike last year, was more than likely going to get elected, along with the possibility of multiple players (two from the same team even) getting the call for the first time in years.  2.) Interest in seeing the PED affect as it relates to voting on those players who tested positively for PED’s, those still under suspicion with no actual evidence, and those who played in the era of PED’s who clearly were not users.  3.)  A host of reasons (PEDs included) why the Hall of Fame voting process is broken.

After reading an abundance of articles, I grew tired of the rehashed points spilling over from sports related websites.  So I searched for a new perspective.  I reached out to people I know who know a little more than the average fan, I wanted to know who they would cast their ballot for.   The main point of the exercise was to view results from fans rather than from a journalist and see what, if any, differences might come of it. 

We followed the same guidelines as the real voters.  

At its core, like any election, subjectivity reigns supreme. 

Our Results vs. BBWAA Results

Player Name

# of times on Ballot

Old 67 % of Vote

BBWAA % of Vote

Greg Maddux

1st

100%

97%

Tom Glavine

1st

100%

92%

Frank Thomas

1st

87%

84%

Craig Biggio

2nd

75%

74%

Mike Piazza

2nd

75%

62%

Curt Schilling

2nd

75%

29%

Jeff Bagwell

4th

50%

54%

Roger Clemens

2nd

37%

35%

Barry Bonds

2nd

37%

34%

Edgar Martinez

5th

37%

25%

Tim Raines

7th

37%

46%

Jack Morris

15th

25%

61%

Lee Smith

12th

25%

29%

Alan Trammell

13th

25%

20%

Mark McGwire

8th

25%

11%

Larry Walker

4th

12%

10%

Fred McGriff

5th

12%

11%

Sammy Sosa

2nd

12%

7%

Mike Mussina

1st

12%

20%

Jeff Kent

1st

12%

15%

Don Mattingly

14th

0%

8%

Rafael Palmeiro

4th

0%

4%

Kenny Rogers

1st

0%

0.2%

Luis Gonzalez

1st

0%

0.9%

Moises Alou

1st

0%

1.0%

Ray Durham

1st

0%

0.0%

Hideo Nomo

1st

0%

1.0%

Richie Sexson

1st

0%

0.0%

Paul Lo Duca

1st

0%

0.0%

Armando Benitez

1st

0%

0.2%

Mike Timlin

1st

0%

0.0%

Sean Casey

1st

0%

0.0%

Jacque Jones

1st

0%

0.2%

Eric Gagne

1st

0%

0.4%

J.T. Snow

1st

0%

0.4%

Todd Jones

1st

0%

0.0%

Meet the Old 67 Hall of Fame Voters –

Alan Wright and me.

This website, our business partnership, and friendship would cease to exist if it not for our common bond – the game of baseball.   Baseball has been the main reason behind numerous insane Spring Training adventures down to Florida, long-winded debates about Barry Bonds, and hours spent together watching playoff baseball.   Without baseball, a punk rock enthusiast and a Hip Hop fan would head down the road of life our own separate ways.

@old_67

Mike Ankerson

My brother, a former high school pitcher, is the one person I can rely on to get a true understanding of how a player views the game.  His unique perspective is always a highlight for me.  He knows what he’s talking about when it comes to this sport.

@mankerson

Alex Allister

My cousin Alex who contributes regularly to Old67 and is a diehard Brewer fan.

@alexallister09

Jonathan Hodges

Owner of Underdog Records, my favorite record store in Winston-Salem.  Jonathan’s store boasts a great selection of vinyl and I am quite certain it’s the only place in my town where conversations about music and baseball flow freely together at the checkout counter.

@underdogrecord

Jan Ankerson

My mom was the person who taught me how to score a baseball game and instilled her passion of the game in her two sons.   Her father, Hank Camelli, played 5 years in the big leagues with the Pittsburg Pirates and Boston Braves.  My mom was there when the New York Mets captured the ’69 World Series.  She ran onto the field after the final out, pulled up some Shea Stadium outfield grass, and planted that section of grass in the front yard of the home she grew up in.

Ryan Tuttle and Zac Newell are two coworkers at my day job.  Ryan worked a few years in the Durham Bulls organization.  Zac is a bit younger than me and I am always eager to learn something from the perspective of a twenty-something sports fan.

A seemingly disparate group of people with one thing in common; they are passionate fans of the game.  Through numerous baseball conversations with each, I have found myself interested in their insights and opinions of the game.  I was not the least bit surprised how quickly each responded and how eager they were for the results.  If you are bestowed the honor of voting players into the Hall of Fame, the voter should have a passion and high knowledge of  Major League Baseball.  The eight people I enlisted for this exercise, including myself,  possess those traits.

The ballot results for each are listed below:

Ballot Results

Once I received each of their lists, I had them answer the following question:

Q:  If Pete Rose was included on the list of eligible players would he have made your list?

A: Mike – No, Alex – Yes, Matt – Yes, Alan – No, Jonathan – Yes, Jan – Yes, Ryan – Yes, and Zac – Yes

The results would have given Mr. Charlie Hustle exactly 75% of the vote and induction into the Hall of Fame…that is if our gang of eight were responsible for electing players into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

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